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    Hanne Lamon (1982), photographer

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    Describe your work in a few words.

    Intimate, fragile, mysterious, emotional.

    How did you start with photography?

    At 14, I found an analog camera from my mother, and I started photographing myself and my friends. I was so passionate about it that I studied photography at KASK. Now I teach at DKO (part-time art education) and I’m working on personal projects.

    What is your creative process?

    I work very eclectic: with different digital and analog cameras, in color or black and white. The feel of the print is of great importance to me. Finding the right paper and finishing is an essential part: it adds value to my work.

    Do you have a dream destination?

    I’m drawn to unspoiled nature: mountains and water keep returning in my work. But what surrounds me close to home also serves as an inspiration. I often start from images in my head, that transform during the process.

    What are your plans for the future?

    I love to exhibit. How to combine images, how they impact each other, how they work in a certain space, … I have a few exhibitions planned for the near future.

    I recently printed my first photo book ‘struggle strangle struck’ and I want to make another one. I think that’s funny, because it’s such a complex process, but it got me in a way!

    I’m also fascinated by graphic printing techniques. I really want to use them in a future series.

    Do you have a motto?

    Photography is kind of therapeutic for me. I strongly believe being creative is good for you.

    I love the philosophy of Dutch artist herman de vries: without change, there’s no chance. In 2018, I participated in a master class with Paul Kooiker. The exhibit eight of us organized afterwards was titled ‘chance & change’.

    What is your biggest enemy?

    Time. I need time to create: developing a series requires a process. There are still things waiting, but I also have a family and I teach.

    What piece of art has made a lasting impression?

    A work from Dirk Braeckman I once saw in Museum M (Leuven): a very big print on super thin paper. I also look for this fragility in my work and prints.

    Who inspires you?

    Daisuku Yokota, Gerhard Richter, Wolfgang Tillmans, Gilbert Fastenaekens, Geert Goiris, Awoiska van der Molen, Tine Guns, Thomas Vandenberghe, Katrien Deblauwer, Sarah Eechaut, Elke Boon, Dirk Braeckman, Jeff Wall, ....

    What is your goal?

    Finding a balance between family, photography and teaching.